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Weight loss surgery may help ease urinary incontinence

Weight-loss surgery appears to have an additional side benefit -- it may improve urinary incontinence symptoms in women, according to a new study. More>>

Exercise may help counter health risks of sedentary lifestyle

Being a couch potato may have fewer long-term health consequences if you trade some of your couch time for gym time, suggests a new study. More>>

Make exercise fun, eat less afterwards

If you make exercise fun, you'll eat less after your workout, new research contends. More>>

Organic foods may be healthier

Organic produce and grains contain more protective antioxidants, less pesticide residue and lower levels of the toxic metal cadmium than food raised in traditional ways, a new review finds. More>>

Staying active may help prevent dementia

Being physically active in middle age appears to help reduce your risk for Alzheimer's disease and other types of dementia, suggest the findings from two new studies. More>>

A little alcohol may not be good for your heart after all

A new study challenges the widely held belief that light drinking of alcohol may be good for your heart. More>>

60 percent of diners use calorie labeling when posted

About six out of 10 adults make use of calorie information on menus, if it's available, to decide what to order in restaurants, according to a new U.S. study. More>>

Around the globe, mom's health key to newborn's size

Well-nourished, healthy and well-educated mothers who receive prenatal care have babies of similar size - regardless of differences in their race, ethnicity or where they live, a new study finds. More>>

Fruits, veggies not a magic bullet for weight loss

Eating lots of fruits and vegetables is often recommended as a way to lose weight, but doing so may not help you shed excess pounds, according to researchers. More>>

Healthy weight loss may bring better sleep, brighter mood

Dropping excess pounds may not only improve your physical health, it might also help you feel more awake and happy, a new study shows. More>>

Diets high in dairy might boost colon cancer survival, a bit

A diet rich in dairy products may slightly extend the lives of people diagnosed with colon cancer, a new study suggests. More>>

FDA: Bee pollen weight loss products pose health risks

Some bee pollen products marketed for weight loss may actually threaten your health, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns. More>>

The effects of wearing high heels

Like many other forms of fashion folly of days gone by, researchers have discovered that wearing high heels, even for a relatively short period of time, can have some major effects on the body. More>>

Soy foods don't seem to protect against uterine cancer

There's no evidence that soy foods protect against uterine cancer, a large Japanese study reports. More>>

10 anti-aging tips to make yourself look younger

Since you can’t wish yourself younger, you’ll just have to defy aging the old-fashioned way -- by trying these 10 anti-aging tips to make yourself look younger. More>>

Exercise may spur more varied gut microbes

Exercise can increase the diversity of bacteria found in the gut, possibly boosting the immune system and improving long-term health, British researchers report. More>>

Cellphone exposure may harm male fertility

Men who carry a cellphone in their pants pocket may harm their sperm and reduce their chances of having children, a new review warns. More>>

Too-clean homes may encourage child allergies, asthma

Cleanliness may be next to godliness, but a home that's too clean can leave a newborn child vulnerable to allergies and asthma later in life, a new study reports. More>>

Yoga may not help ease asthma

Although yoga is believed to boost physical and mental health, it does not seem to help ease symptoms of asthma, a new study finds. More>>

Bicyclists happier than drivers, train riders

Riding a bike may benefit your mind as well as your body. People who use a bicycle to get from one place to another are generally happier than those who drive or use mass transit, according to a new study.
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Could white bread be making you fat?

If you're watching your weight, you may have to watch your white bread consumption, too. More>>

FDA orders new warning labels for tanning beds

Just in time for summer, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced on Thursday that tanning beds and tanning booths now must carry a visible warning explicitly stating that the devices should not be used on people... More>>

Fast weight loss may mean muscle loss

If you lose weight too fast, you lose more muscle than when you shed excess pounds more slowly, a small study says. More>>

Mediterranean diet may keep kids slimmer

Children who eat a Mediterranean-style diet are less likely to be overweight or obese than other youngsters, a new study suggests. More>>

Tips for staying safe in the sun

The Memorial Day weekend marks the unofficial start of summer, and that means it's time to remind you about sun safety to reduce your risk of skin cancer. More>>

Losing weight at any age may help the heart

Healthy weight loss at any time in adulthood is good for your heart, a new study indicates. More>>

Sperm, semen defects may be linked to shorter life spans

Men rendered infertile due to defects in their semen and sperm are more likely to die early than men with normal semen, new research suggests. More>>

There may be such a thing as 'too much exercise'

Is there a limit to the benefits of exercise? Two studies suggest that, for certain people, keeping to a moderate physical activity regimen may be best for heart health. More>>

Syphilis cases climbing among gay men

Syphilis has returned with a vengeance to the gay community, U.S. health officials reported Friday. More>>

Skin cancer prevention tips you can use

One in five Americans will develop skin cancer at some point in their lives, making it the most common type of cancer in the nation. More>>

40 isn't too old to start intensive exercise

Men who begin endurance exercise after age 40 may get similar long-term heart benefits as those who start training before age 30, new research finds. More>>

Could a few beers a week cut a woman's rheumatoid arthritis risk?

Having a beer a few times a week might help women avoid painful rheumatoid arthritis, a new study suggests. More>>

Prenatal fish oil supplements may not boost child's brain health

SATURDAY, May 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) - Despite public health recommendations that women consume omega-3 fatty acid supplements while pregnant, new research suggests that offspring do not gain any mental health benefit. More>>

US task force: Doctors should give toddlers fluoride treatments

Primary care doctors should start playing a more prominent role in dental care for children, according to new recommendations from the influential U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. More>>

Ironclad findings about red meat's harms?

A type of iron found only in red meat is associated with an increase in the risk of heart disease, a new review finds. More>>

Spouse's sunny outlook may be good for your health

Marriage vows often include the promise to stick together for better or for worse, and research now suggests that when it comes to your health, having an optimistic spouse is better. More>>

How to keep your fitness goals on track

The New Year's resolutions many made to get fit have stalled by now. And one expert thinks that's because many people set their goals too high. More>>

Extroverts happier regardless of culture

Being outgoing makes you happier no matter where you live, a new international study says. More>>

Crunchy or smooth? Food's texture may sway perception of calories

Creamy butter or ice cream versus a crunchy granola bar: A new study suggests that the texture of foods influences people's dieting choices. More>>

Yoga big on West Coast, chiropractors popular in Midwest

Folks on the West Coast are faithful followers of yoga and meditation. Midwesterners turn to chiropractors or osteopathic doctors for their aches and pains. More>>

Less salt use tied to drop in British heart deaths

A drop in salt consumption likely played a big role in a recent large reduction in deaths related to heart disease and stroke in England, a new study suggests. More>>

A doctor's 'people skills' affects patients' health

A doctor's "bedside manner" seems to have a real effect on patients' health, a new research review suggests. More>>

Beans, lentils, peas: Your recipe for lower cholesterol?

Eating beans, lentils and other legumes may help you cut down on LDL "bad" cholesterol and lower your risk for heart disease, a new review suggests. More>>

CDC salt guidelines too low for good health

Don't toss out your salt shaker just yet: A new analysis from Denmark finds current recommended salt guidelines may be too low. More>>

Too much running tied to shorter life span

Running regularly has long been linked to a host of health benefits, including weight control, stress reduction, better blood pressure and cholesterol. More>>

Fruits and veggies may reduce death risk

A diet filled with fresh produce is good for your health, and now a large study suggests that eating plenty of fruits and vegetables may substantially cut your risk of death. More>>

Stronger muscles may mean better health for kids

Preteens with strong muscles may have healthier blood pressure, cholesterol and body-fat levels than their less brawny peers, a new study suggests. More>>

Fewer Americans would smoke if cessation treatments were covered

More Americans would quit smoking if coverage for every type of smoking-cessation treatment was provided by all state Medicaid programs, and if states removed barriers to coverage, according to a federal government study. More>>

Smoking bans linked to drop in premature births, kids' asthma attacks

Bans on smoking in public places and the workplace in North America and Europe are linked to a 10 percent drop in premature births and the number of children going to the hospital for an asthma flare-up. More>>

Marathon training might boost heart health

Marathon training may be a good way for middle-aged men to reduce their risk of heart problems, a new study suggests. More>>

Exercise affects men's, women's hearts differently

The formula doctors use to evaluate treadmill stress tests, and thereby assess heart health, doesn't account for important differences between men and women, a new study contends. More>>

Take heart: Mediterranean diet combats diabetes

Adhering to a so-called Mediterranean diet may reduce your risk of diabetes, especially if you're at high risk for heart disease. More>>

Ways to cut your colon cancer risk

Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death, but there are ways of reducing your risk. More>>

When moms get active, kids follow

Want to keep your little kids active? A new study suggests that mothers may be the key: Preschool children with more active moms appear more likely to be active themselves. More>>

More muscles linked to longer life

The more muscle older adults have, the lower their risk of death, according to a new study. More>>

Offices with open floor plans tied to more sick days

Offices with open floor plans and no individual workstations may take a toll on employee health, a new study from Sweden suggests. More>>

Keep your heart healthy

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States, and 49 percent of adults have at least one risk factor for the disease.
More>>

Flu can infect many without causing symptoms

Think you know who has the flu? Think again: a new study finds that three-quarters of people infected with seasonal flu and swine flu in recent years showed no symptoms. More>>

'Five-second' food rule may be real

The five-second rule -- pick up that dropped food on the floor fast if you want to safely eat it -- may have some basis in reality, researchers report. More>>

Protein from meat, fish may help men age well

Older men may gain a boost physically, mentally and socially if they eat a diet rich in meat and fish, according to a new study from Japan. More>>

Weed use up, cocaine use down

Americans' use of cocaine fell by half from 2006 to 2010, but marijuana use increased by more than 30 percent during that time, according to a new report. More>>

Do harder working husbands have healthier wives?

Husbands beware: Wives now have another reason to want you to work longer and harder. The more a male spouse works, the healthier his wife will be, new research suggests. More>>

Balanced diet during pregnancy may lower risk of preterm delivery

Expectant mothers are often told to eat lots of fruits and vegetables, and a new study adds to evidence that a healthy diet is linked to a reduced risk of premature birth. More>>

Diet to reduce blood pressure may also stave off kidney stones

A diet originally designed to lower blood pressure may also be effective for preventing kidney stones, according to a new study. More>>

Schools add more fruits, veggies to the '3 Rs'

Under new U.S. guidelines on school lunches, low-income students are eating more fruits and vegetables, according to a new study. More>>

FDA's new food labels would focus on calories, sugar content

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration formally proposed Thursday updating the "nutrition facts" labels on food products to better reflect Americans' current eating habits and health concerns. More>>

Flu shot may lower stroke risk

Getting the seasonal flu shot could provide a bonus: It might also significantly reduce your risk of stroke, a new study suggests. More>>

Beauty, not health may spur teens to use sunscreen

If you really want to motivate teens to use sunscreen, you might try appealing to their vanity. More>>

Safe sex education must start long before teens engage in sex

Having a stable home life as a child, nice friends and success at school reduces the odds of getting sexually transmitted diseases as a young adult, according to a new study. More>>

Who's a hunk depends on time of the month

So, when you're in between menstrual periods, that shy, sensitive guy may make your heart flutter, but the burly man with the deep voice looks inexplicably irresistible when you're ovulating. More>>

'Talking' medical devices, apps continue to evolve

They remind you when it's time to take your medicine, coach you through emergency medical procedures and text you their approval when you eat your veggies. More>>

Moderate exercise may cut women's stroke risk

Brisk walking, tennis and other types of moderate exercise may lower a woman's stroke risk by one-fifth, a new study says. More>>

U.S. teens eat too much salt, hiking obesity risk

American teens are taking in as much dietary salt as adults, far exceeding guidelines on healthy limits for daily consumption, new research warns. More>>

Many young Americans with HIV delay treatment

A troubling new study finds that one-third to nearly half of American teens and young adults with HIV delay treatment until their infection is advanced, putting them at risk for serious health problems. More>>

Are you addicted to being too busy?

These days, having a crammed work, kids and activities schedule has almost become a status symbol. But being super-busy isn’t always a sign of a fulfilling life More>>

Stressed by work-life balance? Just exercise

Feeling conflicted by the push-pull of work and family life? New research suggests that regular exercise can help balance out those feelings. More>>

10 heart-healthy Valentine’s dinner date ideas

Before you head out with your date or loved-one wrapped around your arm, take a moment to consider a few of these tips to keep your special, Valentine's Day dinner a little more heart-healthy. More>>

Gov't wants to update food labels

America's food labels may get their first makeover in more than 20 years. More>>

How to prevent winter sports injuries

Get out and enjoy winter but take steps to protect yourself from common ski- and snowboard-related injuries such as sprains, strains, dislocations and fractures, an orthopedist says. More>>

5 naturally soothing scents

While we can’t always crawl into bed at any given hour in the day, we can surround ourselves with calming aromas at anytime. Here are five scents that have been proven to naturally soothe.
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Could turning down the thermostat help you lose weight?

Could your warm and cozy home be hindering your weight-loss efforts? More>>

Extra sleep in morning may help teens stay alert in class

Delaying the morning school bell might help teens avoid sleep deprivation, according to a new study. Later school start times appear to improve teens' sleep and reduce their daytime sleepiness. More>>

Sunlight might be good for your blood pressure

Sunlight is known to lower blood pressure, but now a team of British researchers has figured out why. More>>

No proof that 'blood-type' diets work

The so-called "blood-type diet" may be trendy, but there's no scientific evidence to support it, a new study says. More>>

Quinoa may be safe grain for people with celiac disease

The grain quinoa seems safe for people with celiac disease, a new British study suggests. More>>

Americans eating better, cutting calories

American adults are eating healthier diets, making better use of nutrition information on food labels, consuming more fiber and less cholesterol, and getting fewer calories from total fat and saturated fat. More>>

Your guide to keeping kids healthy

Your kids may come home from school this winter with something more worrisome than homework -- sniffles, tummy bugs and even (ick!) lice. More>>

Easier way for doctors to identify substance abuse?

A single question may help doctors determine whether a patient has a drug or alcohol problem and the level of abuse, a new study suggests. More>>

Want to stay healthy? Try washing your hands

Like "Turn out the lights" and "Don't slam the door," being told to "Wash your hands" is one of those universal instructions children hear every day. More>>

Stocking epinephrine in schools might save lives

As a pediatrician at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, Dr. Sarah Denny has seen her share of the life-threatening reactions that can happen with food allergies. More>>

Media focus on obesity may backfire for some women

Feeling a little fat after the holidays? Beware. Reading a news story that seems to devalue people who are overweight might make you more likely to reach for snacks to soothe your anxiety. More>>

Ban on class of chemicals lowers human exposures

The banning of certain types of a common class of chemicals known as phthalates has reduced Americans' exposure to the chemicals' potential harms, a new study suggests. More>>

Women more open to weight-loss surgery

Women are four times more likely than men to seek weight-loss surgery, a new study finds. More>>

Ease into a workout program to prevent injuries

If your New Year's resolution was to get in shape, you should ease into your exercise program, an expert warns. Trying to get quick results could do more harm than good. More>>

Your daily coffee just might jolt your memory

Swarms of morning commuters clutch cups of coffee to kick-start the workday. But a new study suggests caffeine might do more for the brain than boost alertness -- it may help memory too. More>>

CDC: Docs aren't doing enough to discourage problem drinking

Doctors aren't talking often enough with their patients about the harmful effects of alcohol, even if those patients are binge drinkers, U.S. health officials reported. More>>

5 ways to keep skin healthy all winter

Between the cold dry air outdoors and the hot dry air indoors, skin definitely needs a little more TLC. Read on to find out how to winter-proof your skin care routine. More>>

Labeling food with 'stop' or 'go' colors might spur healthier diet

Hospitals might be able to coax cafeteria customers to buy healthier food by adjusting item displays to have traffic light-style green, yellow and red labels based on their level of nutrition, new research suggests. More>>

The cold, hard truth about surviving bitter winter weather

The record-shattering cold weather that's gripping much of the United States can pose extreme health risks, doctors warned Monday. More>>

Get fit before you hit the slopes

Downhill skiing is a great way to enjoy winter, but you need to prepare your body beforehand to reduce the risk of injuries, an expert suggests. More>>

Weight fluctuations: Why does the scale say that?

Most women play some version of the scale game whenever they weigh themselves, but the truth is there are at least eight reasons why the numbers can fluctuate so much. More>>

Boosting access to healthier grocery stores might not improve eating habits

"If you build it, they will come" might not apply to putting more grocery stores in poor Americans' neighborhoods. More>>

Ready to get in shape? Ease into exercise

Watching the Winter Olympics in Sochi may inspire some to get off the couch and begin working out or playing sports, but it's important to ease into these activities, an expert suggests. More>>

Could low-fat yogurt help ward off diabetes?

People looking to avoid type 2 diabetes might want to increase the amount of yogurt they eat, a new study by British researchers suggests. More>>

Want to keep the weight off? Weekday meals may be key

People trying to lose weight should pay close attention to what they eat during the week, and not worry as much about enjoying themselves during the weekend, a new study suggests. More>>

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