As Temperatures Hit 90, San Diegans Hit the Beaches - CBS News 8 - San Diego, CA News Station - KFMB Channel 8

As Temperatures Hit 90, San Diegans Hit the Beaches

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The first hot spell of the summer began Sunday, driving some inland temperatures into the 90s, but it won't last too long, a National Weather Service meteorologist said.

"We've been sort of due for some heat," said Steve Vanderburg of the NWS. "It was a long time coming."

The hot spot in the county was Borrego Springs, which was 113 degrees at 2 p.m., according to National Weather Service records. Ramona was 98 degrees, Valley Center 96 and Campo was 95.

Vanderburg said a thunderstorm struck near Campo, but San Diego County was only on the fringe of the monsoonal flow. A high pressure system is too far south to push tropical weather our direction, he said.
"There's nothing too crazy out there," Vanderburg said.

The warm temperatures sent thousands of area residents to the beach, where they found small waves and only a mild rip current, San Diego lifeguard Lt. Andy Lerum said. There were few rescues, he said.

Mission Beach and Pacific Beach were packed, but outlying beaches had plenty of open space to make for a "typical summer day," Lerum said.

Vanderburg said it will remain hot Monday. By Tuesday, high temperatures in the inland valleys will dip back into the 80s, he said. The ocean temperature was measured at 63.

The next warm-up could be over the July 4th holiday weekend, he said.

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