4 San Diego hospitals fined by state for poor care - CBS News 8 - San Diego, CA News Station - KFMB Channel 8

4 San Diego hospitals fined by state for poor care

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LOS ANGELES (AP) — Nine hospitals in California face a combined $550,000 in penalties for endangering patients through medication errors, leaving sponges inside patients after surgery and other problems. According to the California Department of Public Health, the fines ranged from $50,000 to $75,000 for each incident.

Four of the hospitals fined are in San Diego County, with the rest in Alameda, San Bernardino, Marin, Orange and Riverside counties.

Pomerado Hospital in Poway, Scripps Green Hospital in La Jolla and Tri-City Medical Center are accused of failing to ensure the health and safety of patients.

Pomerado and Tri-City were each fined $50,000. Rady Children's Hospital was fined $50,000 for allegedly failing to implement established policies and procedures for the safe and effective administration of medication.

Scripps Green Hospital in La Jolla was fined twice, a total of $125,000. In one instance, a surgeon performing a hip replacement reported discovering dried blood on an instrument being used on a patient. A spokesman for the hospital said Thursday it was preparing a response.

Since 2007 when the fines were enacted as law, a combined $4.8 million in fines have been assessed, and $2.9 million have been collected.

 

Copyright 2010 The Associated Press.

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