Governor vetoes democratic budget plan - CBS News 8 - San Diego, CA News Station - KFMB Channel 8

Governor vetoes democratic budget plan

Posted: Updated:
State Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg, D-Sacramento, left, talks Sen. Ellen Corbett, D-San Leandro and Senate budget committee chair Mark Leno, D-San Francisco, after the Senate session at the Capitol June 13, 2011. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli) State Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg, D-Sacramento, left, talks Sen. Ellen Corbett, D-San Leandro and Senate budget committee chair Mark Leno, D-San Francisco, after the Senate session at the Capitol June 13, 2011. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
California Gov. Jerry Brown is shown Thursday, June 16, 2011 during a news conference in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes) California Gov. Jerry Brown is shown Thursday, June 16, 2011 during a news conference in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

LOS ANGELES (CNS) - Gov. Jerry Brown Thursday vetoed the state budget approved by Democratic lawmakers - a spending package that had Los Angeles-area city officials and education leaders scrambling to figure out how the spending proposal would impact services and schools.

"Unfortunately, the budget I have received is not a balanced solution," according to Brown, who was scheduled to further discuss his veto at a Los Angeles news conference this afternoon. "It continues big deficits for years to come and adds billions of dollars in new debt.

"It also contains legally questionable maneuvers, costly borrowing and unrealistic savings," Brown added.

Los Angeles city leaders had expressed concern that the state budget would have impacted the city's Community Redevelopment Agency, which would have seen an initial $70 million hit and subsequent annual payments to the state of about $38 million in order to continue operating.

Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa and mayors of nine other other cities, including Long Beach, Anaheim and Santa Ana, issued a statement condemning the Legislature for "failing to craft a legal and sustainable budget."

"Their so-called remedy for the state's deficit is an illegal and indefensible shakedown of our cities," according to the statement. "Over the past several months, we have pro-actively worked with state leaders to create sound alternatives that keep redevelopment alive and solve the state's budget problems.

"But rather than create sensible, long-term solutions for California's dismal financial problems, they sought to recklessly raid local tax dollars and kill redevelopment - our strongest local tool to revitalize the economy and create jobs now."

Brown took shots at both Democrats and Republicans in his veto message. He said he had proposed a balanced budget in January that would have protected education and public safety through a temporary extension of some taxes upon voter approval.

"Yet Republicans in the Legislature blocked the right of the people to vote on this honest, balanced budget," Brown said.

It remains to be seen how legislators will proceed from here and if they will get paid. An amendment to the state constitution approved by voters in

November prevents lawmakers from getting paid unless they pass a balanced budget by a June 15 deadline. It does not specify whether or not the budget must be signed by the governor.

"We can and must do better," Brown said.

He added a warning to Republicans: "If they continue to obstruct a vote, we will be forced to pursue deeper and more destructive cuts to schools and public safety - a tragedy for which Republicans will bear full responsibility."

Senate Republican leader Bob Dutton, R-Rancho Cucamonga, on Wednesday called the budget package "irresponsible" and said it "demonstrates that legislative Democrats would rather pander to their special interest allies than adopt the long-term budget solutions that Californians demand and deserve."

"Let me say it again, Senate Republicans provided Governor Brown and the Democrats a pathway to a bi-partisan budget solution that would have allowed voters to decide on taxes, meaningful pension reform and a hard spending cap," Dutton said. "On March 25, Governor Brown said no and broke off budget negotiations with Republicans."

The budget package also had uncertain consequences for schools. The Legislature's action came just one day after the Los Angeles Unified School District rescinded thousands of layoff notices to teachers and other workers - based in part on assurances from the state that it would make good on $150 million in funding.

Powered by Frankly
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2018 KFMB-TV. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy, and Terms of Service, and Ad Choices.