Oslo bomb was 'Oklahoma City-type' - CBS News 8 - San Diego, CA News Station - KFMB Channel 8

Oslo bomb was 'Oklahoma City-type'

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Unidentified survivors from the shooting at an island youth retreat react outside a hotel where survivors were being reunited with their families in Sundvolden, Norway, Saturday, July 23, 2011. Unidentified survivors from the shooting at an island youth retreat react outside a hotel where survivors were being reunited with their families in Sundvolden, Norway, Saturday, July 23, 2011.
This is an undated image obtained from the Twitter page of Anders Behring Breivik, 32, who was arrested Friday July 22, 2011 in connection to the twin attacks on a youth camp and a government building in Oslo, Norway. Breivik is a suspect in both the shoo This is an undated image obtained from the Twitter page of Anders Behring Breivik, 32, who was arrested Friday July 22, 2011 in connection to the twin attacks on a youth camp and a government building in Oslo, Norway. Breivik is a suspect in both the shoo
Norwegian Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg speaks to the media at the Ulleval University hospital in Olso, Norway Saturday July 23, 2011. A Norwegian dressed as a police officer gunned down at least 84 people at an island retreat, police said Saturday. (AP Norwegian Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg speaks to the media at the Ulleval University hospital in Olso, Norway Saturday July 23, 2011. A Norwegian dressed as a police officer gunned down at least 84 people at an island retreat, police said Saturday. (AP
Armed police officers are seen on the island of Utoya, Norway Saturday, July 23, 2011. The 32-year-old man suspected in bomb and shooting attacks that killed at least 91 people in Norway bought six tons of fertilizer before the massacres Armed police officers are seen on the island of Utoya, Norway Saturday, July 23, 2011. The 32-year-old man suspected in bomb and shooting attacks that killed at least 91 people in Norway bought six tons of fertilizer before the massacres
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  • Police: Oslo bomb, camp shootings domestic terror

    Police: Oslo bomb, camp shootings domestic terror

    Friday, July 22 2011 9:54 PM EDT2011-07-23 01:54:26 GMT
    A homegrown terrorist set off an explosion that ripped open buildings in the heart of Norway's government Friday, then went to a summer camp dressed as a police officer and gunned down youths 
    A homegrown terrorist set off an explosion that ripped open buildings in the heart of Norway's government Friday, then went to a summer camp dressed as a police officer and gunned down youths as they ran and even swam for their lives, police said Friday. 

OSLO, Norway (AP) — A police official has told The Associated Press that the bomb used in the attack at the Norwegian prime minister's office was "some kind of Oklahoma City-type" device made of fertilizer and diesel fuel.

The official said it remains unclear what kind of detonator was used for the bomb, which investigators say was packed into a panel truck and killed at least seven people when it went off.

The official was speaking on condition of anonymity because the information has not been formally released.

A 4,000 pound (1,815 kilogram) fertilizer-and-fuel-oil bomb detonated in front of a federal building in Oklahoma City in 1995, killing 168 people.

Copyright 2011 The Associated Press.

THIS IS AN UPDATE TO THE PREVIOUS STORY BELOW.

OSLO, Norway (AP) — A gunman who opened fire on an island teeming with young people kept shooting for 1.5 hours before surrendering to a SWAT team, which arrived 40 minutes after they were called, police said Saturday.

Survivors of the shooting spree have described hiding and fleeing into the water to escape the gunman, but a police briefing Saturday detailed for the first time how long the terror lasted — and how long victims waited for help.

When the SWAT team arrived, the gunman, who had two firearms, surrendered, said Police Chief Sveinung Sponheim.

"There were problems with transport to Utoya" island, where the youth-wing of Norway's Labor Party was holding a retreat, Sponheim said. "It was difficult to get a hold of boats, but that problem was solved when the SWAT team arrived."

At least 85 people were killed on the island, but police said four or five people were still missing. Divers have been searching the waters around the island.

The attack followed a bombing at a government building in Oslo, where seven people were killed. Police are still digging through rubble there, and Sponheim said body parts remain in the building.

Police have not identified the suspect, but Norwegian national broadcaster NRK say he is 32-year-old Anders Behring Breivik. Authorities have not identified a motive but have said he visited Christian fundamentalist websites and once belonged to the youth-wing of a rightist party.

Police said he is talking to them and has admitted to firing weapons on the island. It was not clear if he had confessed to anything else he is accused of. Police said he retained a lawyer, but the attorney did not want to be named.

"He has had a dialogue with the police the whole time, but he's a very demanding suspect," Sponheim said.

Norway's royal family and prime minister led the nation in mourning, visiting grieving relatives of the scores of youth gunned down.

Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg said the twin attacks made Friday peacetime Norway's deadliest day.

"This is beyond comprehension. It's a nightmare. It's a nightmare for those who have been killed, for their mothers and fathers, family and friends," Stoltenberg told reporters earlier Saturday.

Copyright 2011 The Associated Press.

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