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Food Formulation Trends: Ingredients Consumers Avoid

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LONDON, May 6, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Reportbuyer.com has added a new market research report:

Food Formulation Trends: Ingredients Consumers Avoid

http://www.reportbuyer.com/food_drink/diet_health_foods/food_formulation_trends_ingredients_consumers_avoid.html

Food avoidance has become a way of life for tens of millions of American consumers of all ages. For consumers with allergies and intolerances, avoiding certain food and ingredients is a matter of life and death. But for other consumers avoiding various foods is a matter of choice based on a desire to lose weight or to have an overall healthier life.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the numbers of people with allergies is on the rise. In addition, many sources suggest that the number of people choosing to avoid some ingredients, such as gluten, is also increasing. Many in this group of consumers have no specific illness but are reacting to a barrage of messages received through social media, online, and traditional media sources suggesting that some ingredients are a health threat to the general populace, not just the limited number of people who have been diagnosed with an allergy, intolerance, or sensitivity.

Food manufacturers, recognizing the opportunity to appeal to concerned consumers who also tend to be trendsetters for other consumers, are extremely accommodating to this trend, reformulating products to eliminate those ingredients that are being shunned. Of course, food manufacturers have been reformulating their products for decades, especially products in which the fat, sugar, or salt contents needed to be reduced or eliminated in order to appeal to more health-conscious consumers. In the current market, manufacturers are looking to appeal to this same base by eliminating such ingredients as gluten as well as Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs). The move by General Mills to introduce a non-GMO version of its Cheerios product is especially interesting in that the company has contributed hundreds of thousands of dollars to the campaigns to defeat mandatory labeling of products containing GMO ingredients.

Food Formulation and Ingredient Trends: What Consumers Avoid offers an up-to-date assessment of developments in the food avoidance trend. In addition to looking at data on consumer preferences and attitudes toward specific foods and ingredients, the report covers the actions that are being taken by food and ingredient manufacturers and grocery retailers in order to respond to consumer trends as well as what the courts and government agencies are doing in terms of defining the limits of ingredient usage.

Scope and Methodology

The consumer demographics analysis was developed using data from the 12-Month Spring 2013 Simmons National Consumer Survey Adult Study Base from Experian Marketing Services. The report also draws on a proprietary Packaged Facts National Online Consumer Survey completed in June 2013.

Information on new product introductions was derived from an examination of the retail milieu and from relevant trade, business, and government sources, including company literature, websites, and annual reports.
Chapter 1: Executive Summary
Scope and Methodology of This Report
Consumer Use Data
Product Information
Context and Issues
Food Avoidance on the Increase
USDA Reports Consumer Diet Improvements
Key Food/Ingredient Categories
Table 1-1: Types of Foods Bought When Watching Diet, 2013 (percent of adult population presently watching their diet)
Fat
Table 1-2: Reason for Watching Diet-Cholesterol Level, Fat Intake, and Heart Disease, 2013 (percent of adult population presently watching their diet)
Sweeteners
Table 1-3: Reason for Watching Diet-Blood Sugar Level and Diabetes, 2013 (percent of adult population presently watching their diet)
Sodium
Table 1-4: Trends in Reasons for Watching Diet-Hypertension and Salt Intake, 2004-2013 (percent of U.S. adults)
Food Intolerances/Sensitivities/Allergies
Figure 1-1: "Food Restrictions, Food Allergies, or Foods/Ingredients I Avoid Play an Important Role in What I Eat," 2014 (U.S. adults)
Figure 1-2: Consumers Cutting Back on White Bread and Breads or Baked Goods Because of Ingredients, June 2013 (percent of U.S. consumers)
Food Processing Additives
Table 1-5: Preference for Foods Without Artificial Additives, 2007-2013 (percent of U.S. households)
Agricultural Production
Table 1-6: Concern About GMO Food Products, June 2013 (percent of U.S. consumers)
Other Food/Ingredient Categories of Note
Product Development
Chapter 2: Food Avoidances: Context and Issues
Key Points
Context: Inclusion vs. Exclusion
A Perpetual Caveat
Caveat About Research Studies
American Diets Worsening
Motivations for Food Avoidance
Food Allergies May Be More Extensive Than Proven Cases Suggest
Food Avoidance in Larger Social Context
Health Concerns Drive "Free From" Product Sales
Food Avoidance Is Not New
Motivating Influences in Food Avoidance
Religion-Health Connection
Health and Wellness
Prevention (Avoiding Foods for Future Health)
Disease Management
Table 2-1: 15 Leading Causes of Death in the U.S
More Than Half of Individual Consumers and Households Are Watching Their Diet
Table 2-2: Trends in Share of U.S. Population Watching Diet, 2004-2013 (percent of U.S. adults)
Table 2-3: Trends in Share of U.S. Households Watching Diet, 2004-2013 (percent of U.S. households)
Most Diet Watchers Want to Lose Weight
Table 2-4: Trends in Reasons for Watching Diet, 2004-2013 (percent of U.S. adults)
Table 2-5: Reason for Watching Diet, 2013 (percent of adult population presently watching their diet)
Men Motivated to Watch Diet Out of Heart Disease Concern
Table 2-6: Reason for Watching Diet, by Gender and Age (index of U.S. adults)
Table 2-7: Reason for Watching Diet, by Race (index of U.S. adults)
Table 2-8: Reason for Watching Diet, by Education (index of U.S. adults)
Table 2-9: Reason for Watching Diet, by Household Income (index of U.S. adults)
Table 2-10: Reason for Watching Diet, by Socio Economic Level (index of U.S. adults)
Table 2-11: Reason for Watching Diet, by Region (index of U.S. adults)
Table 2-12: Reason for Watching Diet, by Children in Household (index of U.S. adults)
Dieters Favor Several "Free From" Products
Table 2-13: Trends in Types Of Foods Bought When Watching Diet, 2009-2013 (percent of U.S. adults)
Table 2-14: Types of Foods Bought When Watching Diet, 2013 (percent of adult population presently watching their diet)
Smaller Portions an Emerging Trend
Political and Philosophical Reasons for Food Avoidance
Support for Organic Products
Distrust of Food Industry
Physical Appearance
Weight Loss/Maintenance
Skin, Hair, and Nail Health
Forestalling the Aging Process
Momentum Grows in Free-From Movement
Clean Labels
Alice Waters, Organics Champion
Free From Food Expo
Foods Matter
Online Specialty Grocery Stores
The Engaged/Informed Shopper
Shoppers Mindful of Nutrition, Ingredients
Table 2-15: Awareness of Nutritional Content in Grocery Products, 2013 (percent of U.S. consumers)
Table 2-16: Awareness of Ingredients in Grocery Products, June 2013 (percent of U.S. consumers)
Table 2-17: Shopping Behaviors of Non-GMO Consumers Compared to Total Population, June 2013 (percent of U.S. consumers)
Table 2-18: Tendency to Purchase Natural, Organic, and Non-GMO Grocery Products, June 2013 (percent of U.S. consumers)
Table 2-19: Awareness of "My Plate" Recommendations, February 2013 (percent of consumers)
Table 2-20: Awareness of "Mediterranean Diet" Guidelines, February 2013 (percent of consumers)
Posactive vs. Negative Label Claims
"Free-From" Foods May Produce More Immediate, Observable, or
Quantifiable Results Than Do Designer/Functional Foods
Consumer Willingness to Pay More for Health Is Tested by Economy
Positive vs. Negative Food Claims
More Than 25% of Consumers Cite Food Avoidances in Purchase Decisions
Table 2-21: Importance of Food Avoidances in Household Purchases, February 2013 (percent of consumers)
More Than Four in 10 Consumers Have Favorable Impression of Specially
Formulated Foods
Table 2-22: Attitudes Toward Foods/Beverages Formulated for Specific Health Concerns, February 2013 (percent of consumers)
Table 2-23: Preference for Nutritionally Enhanced Food/Beverage Products, February 2013 (percent of consumers)
Table 2-24: Nutrients Occurring Naturally in Foods
Adding on to Natural Values
Customization of Food Avoidance in QSR
Is "Free From" a Food Fad?
Chapter 3: Key Food/Ingredient Categories: Fat
Key Points
Definition of Fat
Definitions Used in Food Labeling
Types of Fat Covered
Saturated Fat
Trans Fats
Cholesterol
New Medical & Scientific Research
Saturated Fat Controversy Erupts in UK
Saturated Fat Controversy Not New
New U.S. Guidelines on Cholesterol Are Questioned
New Regulatory Directions
Accelerated Trans Fats Ban Sought
Figure 3-1: FDA Trans Fat Ban Notice
Healthy Oils Available
Consumer: Attitudes/Behavior
Cholesterol Levels a Leading Driver for Watching Diet
Table 3-1: Trends in Reasons for Watching Diet-Cholesterol Level, Fat Intake, and Heart Disease, 2004-2013 (percent of U.S. adults)
Table 3-2: Reason for Watching Diet-Cholesterol Level, Fat Intake, and Heart Disease, 2013 (percent of adult population presently watching their diet)
Older Consumers Are Exceptionally Likely to Watch Diet for Cholesterol, Fat, Heart Disease
Table 3-3: Demographic Indicators Favoring Watching Diet for Cholesterol Level, Spring 2013 (index of U.S. adults)
Table 3-4: Demographic Indicators Favoring Watching Diet for Fat Intake, Spring 2013 (index of U.S. adults)
Table 3-5: Demographic Indicators Favoring Watching Diet for Heart Disease, Spring 2013 (index of U.S. adults)
Low/Non-Fat Foods Show Higher Usage Rates Than Low Cholesterol Foods
Table 3-6: Trends in Use of Low Fat, Fat-free, and Low Cholesterol Foods When Watching Diet, 2009-2013 (percent of U.S. adults)
Table 3-7: Use of Low Fat, Fat-free, and Low Cholesterol Foods When Watching Diet, 2013 (percent of U.S. adults and percent of U.S. adults presently watching their diet)
Consumers of Low/Non-Fat, Low Cholesterol Foods Are Younger, Affluent
Table 3-8: Demographic Indicators Favoring Purchase of Low Fat Foods When Watching Diet, Spring 2013 (index of U.S. adults)
Table 3-9: Demographic Indicators Favoring Purchase of Fat Free/Non-fat Foods When Watching Diet, Spring 2013 (index of U.S. adults)
Table 3-10: Demographic Indicators Favoring Purchase of Low Cholesterol Foods When Watching Diet, Spring 2013 (index of U.S. adults)
Table 3-11: Trends in Household Use of Low Fat/Fat-Free Products, 2009 vs. 2013 (percent of U.S. households)
Table 3-12: Demographic Indicators Favoring Use of Low Fat/Fat-free Foods, Spring 2013 (percent and index of U.S. households)
Frozen Desserts, Spreads the Most Commonly Used Low Fat/Fat-Free Products
Table 3-13: Usage Rates for Selected Low Fat/Fat-free Products/Product Types, Spring 2013 (percent of U.S. households)
Table 3-14: Usage Rates for Selected Low Fat/Fat-free Product Categories, Spring 2013 (percent of U.S. households)
Table 3-15: Demographic Indicators Favoring Use of Low Fat/Fat-free Ice Cream & Sherbet, Spring 2013 (percent and index of U.S. households)
Table 3-16: Demographic Indicators Favoring Use of Low Fat/Fat-free Mayonnaise, Spring 2013 (percent and index of U.S. households)
Table 3-17: Demographic Indicators Favoring Use of Low Fat/Fat-free Margarine, Spring 2013 (percent and index of U.S. households)
Table 3-18: Demographic Indicators Favoring Use of Low Fat/Fat-free Chips, Spring 2013 (percent and index of U.S. households)
Table 3-19: Demographic Indicators Favoring Use of Low Fat/Fat-free Cookies, Spring 2013 (percent and index of U.S. households)
Table 3-20: Demographic Indicators Favoring Use of Low Fat/Fat-free Cold Cuts, Spring 2013 (percent and index of U.S. households)
Experian Marketing Services: Lifestyles, Food Lifestyles, Health and Well-Being, and Shopping Behavior of Low Fat Food Consumers
Psychographics of Fat Avoiders
Table 3-21: Selected Psychographic Classifications of Low Fat/Fat-free Food Consumers, Spring 2013 (U.S. households)
Chapter 4: Key Food/Ingredient Categories: Sweeteners
Key Points
Definition of Sweetness
Several Different Types of Sweeteners
Sugars: Sucrose, Glucose, and Fructose
Corn Syrup and High Fructose Corn Syrup
Lactose
Honey
Stevia, Agave Syrup, and Other Natural Sweeteners
Organic Stevia Introduced
Artificial Sweeteners
Aspartame
New Regulatory Directions
EU Health Claim for Fructose
HFCS Can't Change Name
NYC Ban on Big Sugar Drinks in Court
Lower Sugar Consumption Recommended
Consumer Attitudes/Behavior
Consumer: Attitudes/Behavior
About 13% of All Consumers and Nearly One-Quarter of Diet-Watchers Monitor Blood Sugar
1Table 4-1: Trends in Reasons for Watching Diet-Blood Sugar Level and Diabetes, 2004-2013 (percent of U.S. adults)
Table 4-2: Reason for Watching Diet-Blood Sugar Level and Diabetes, 2013 (percent of adult population presently watching their diet) Age is a Determining Factors in Watching Diet for Blood Sugar, Diabetes
Table 4-3: Demographic Indicators Favoring Watching Diet for Blood Sugar Level, Spring 2013 (index of U.S. adults)
Table 4-4: Demographic Indicators Favoring Watching Diet for Diabetes, Spring 2013 (index of U.S. adults)
More Consumers Use Sugar-Free Than Low Sugar Foods When Watching Diet
Table 4-5: Trends in Use of Sugar-Free or Low Sugar Foods When Watching Diet, 2009-2013 (percent of U.S. adults)
Table 4-6: Trends in Use of Sugar-Free or Low Sugar Foods When Watching Diet, 2013 (percent of U.S. adults and percent of U.S. adults presently watching their diet)
Users of Sugar-Free Foods/Low Sugar Foods Are Older, Well-Educated
Table 4-7: Demographic Indicators Favoring Purchase of Sugar-Free Foods
When Watching Diet, Spring 2013 (index of U.S. adults)
Table 4-8: Demographic Indicators Favoring Purchase of Low Sugar Foods
When Watching Diet, Spring 2013 (index of U.S. adults)
Over Four in 10 Households Use Sugar Substitutes
Table 4-9: Trends in Household Use of Sugar Substitutes, 2005 vs. 2013 (percent of U.S. households)
Age, Region Factor Strongly in Use of Sugar Substitutes
Table 4-10: Demographic Indicators Favoring Use of Sugar Substitutes, Spring 2013 (percent and index of U.S. households)
Experian Marketing Services: Lifestyles, Food Lifestyles, Health and Well-Being, and Shopping Behavior of Sugar-Free/Low Sugar Food Consumers
Psychographics of Sugar Avoiders
Table 4-11: Selected Psychographic Classifications of Sugar-Free Food Consumers, Spring 2013 (U.S. households)
Table 4-12: Selected Psychographic Classifications of Low Sugar Food Consumers, Spring 2013 (U.S. households)
Chapter 5: Key Food/Ingredient Categories: Sodium
Key Points
Salt
Salt and Health
Sodium Sources in Foods
New Medical & Scientific Research
Research Focus on New Ways to Reduce Sodium Risk
Possible Direction Change in Sodium Reduction
New Regulatory Directions
Food Formulation/Ingredient Trends
The "Low Sodium" Turnoff and Beyond
Yeast and Mushrooms as Salt Replacements
Consumer Attitudes and Behavior
Substantial Awareness of Sodium Impact
Table 5-1: Trends in Reasons for Watching Diet-Hypertension and Salt Intake, 2004-2013 (percent of U.S. adults)
Age, Race Predominant Predictors of Concerns About Hypertension/Salt Intake
Table 5-2: Demographic Indicators Favoring Watching Diet for Hypertension, Spring 2013 (index of U.S. adults)
Table 5-3: Demographic Indicators Favoring Watching Diet for Salt Intake, Spring 2013 (index of U.S. adults)
Fifteen Percent of Consumers Use Low Sodium Foods When Watching Diet
Table 5-4: Trends in Use of Low Sodium Foods When Watching Diet, 2009-2013 (percent of U.S. adults)
Table 5-5: Use of Low Sodium Foods When Watching Diet, 2013 (percent of U.S. adults and percent of U.S. adults presently watching their diet)
Consumers Aged 55-Plus Are Disproportionate Users of Low Sodium Foods
Table 5-6: Demographic Indicators Favoring Purchase of Low-Sodium Foods When Watching Diet, Spring 2013 (index of U.S. adults)
Consumers Resist Unsalting of Favorite Salty Snacks
Table 5-7: Demographic Indicators Favoring Use of Low Sodium Crackers, Spring 2013 (percent and index of U.S. households)
Table 5-8: Demographic Indicators Favoring Use of Unsalted Pretzels, Spring 2013 (percent and index of U.S. households)
Table 5-9: Demographic Indicators Favoring Use of No-Salt Potato Chips, Spring 2013 (percent and index of U.S. households)
Experian Marketing Services: Lifestyles, Food Lifestyles, Health and Well-Being, and Shopping Behavior of Low Sodium Food Consumers
Psychographics of Sodium Avoiders
Table 5-10: Selected Psychographic Classifications of Low Sodium Consumers, Spring 2013 (U.S. households)
Chapter 6: Key Food/Ingredient Categories: Food Intolerances/Sensitivities/Allergies
Key Points
The Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act of 2004
The Big 8
Figure 6-1: Levels of Agreement with Statement, "Food Restrictions, Food Allergies, or Foods/Ingredients I Avoid Play an Important Role in What I Eat," 2014 (U.S. adults)
Food Additive Intolerance
Reactions to Allergens and Additives
Egg Allergy
Fish Allergy
Milk Allergy
Peanut Allergy
Shellfish Allergy
Soy Allergy
Tree Nut Allergy
Wheat Allergy
Celiac Disease and Gluten Intolerance
Gluten Free Driving Growth of "Free From" Category
Wheat Belly Drives Wheat Avoidance
Beyond the Big 8
Meat and/or Poultry Allergy
Corn Allergy
Food Formulation/Ingredient Trends
Looking for New Opportunities in Gluten-Free
New Medical & Scientific Research
Allergies Increasing – But Why?
Regulatory Developments
The Food Safety Modernization Act
Consumer: Attitudes/Behavior
A Growing Number of Consumers Watch Their Diets for Food Allergy, Lactose Intolerance
Table 6-1: Trends in Reasons for Watching Diet-Food Allergy, Lactose Intolerance, or Gluten Intolerance, 2004-2013 (percent of U.S. adults)
Table 6-2: Reason for Watching Diet-Food Allergy, Lactose Intolerance, or Gluten Intolerance, 2013 (percent of adult population presently watching their diet)
Gender, Age, Education Distinguish Avoidance Due to Food Intolerances
Table 6-3: Demographic Indicators Favoring Watching Diet for Food Allergy, Spring 2013 (index of U.S. adults)
Table 6-4: Demographic Indicators Favoring Watching Diet for Lactose Intolerance, Spring 2013 (index of U.S. adults)
Table 6-5: Demographic Indicators Favoring Watching Diet for Gluten Intolerance, Spring 2013 (index of U.S. adults)
Use of Specialty Foods Exceeds Rate of Complaints About Intolerances
Table 6-6: Trends in Use of Lactose-Free Foods When Watching Diet, 2009-2013 (percent of U.S. adults)
Table 6-7: Use of Lactose-Free and Gluten-Free Foods When Watching Diet, 2013 (percent of U.S. adults and percent of U.S. adults presently watching their diet)
Race the Predominant Factor in Purchase of Lactose-Free Foods
Table 6-8: Demographic Indicators Favoring Purchase of Lactose-Free Foods When Watching Diet, Spring 2013 (index of U.S. adults)
Consumers Cutting Back on Wheat Flour and Gluten
Figure 6-2: Consumers Cutting Back on White Bread and Breads or Baked Goods Because of Ingredients, June 2013 (percent of U.S. consumers)
Women Likely Consumers of Gluten-Free Foods
Table 6-9: Demographic Indicators Favoring Purchase of Gluten-Free Foods When Watching Diet, Spring 2013 (index of U.S. adults)
Experian Marketing Services: Lifestyles, Food Lifestyles, Health and Well-Being, and Shopping Behavior of Lactose-Free and Gluten-Free Food Consumers
Psychographics of Lactose and Gluten Avoiders
Table 6-10: Selected Psychographic Classifications of Lactose-Free Food Consumers, Spring 2013 (U.S. households)
Table 6-11: Selected Psychographic Classifications of Gluten-Free Food Consumers, Spring 2013 (U.S. households)
Chapter 7: Key Food/Ingredient Categories: Food Processing Additives
Key Points
The Wide World of Food Additives
History of Additive Use
1958 Food Additives Amendment
Reasons for Additive Avoidance
Delayed Reactions Muddle Awareness
Marketers Responding with Natural Additives
Foodservice Experiencing Food Avoidance Trend
Replacing Artificial with Natural Additives
New Regulatory Directions
Phosphates Under Review
Consumer: Attitudes/Behavior
Most Consumers Avoid Highly Processed Foods, Prefer Those with Fewer Ingredients
Table 7-1: Resistance to Highly Processed Foods, February 2013 (percent of U.S. consumers)
Table 7-2: Preference for Groceries with Fewer/Simpler Ingredients, June 2013 (percent of U.S. consumers)
Table 7-3: Attitudes Toward Processed Foods Reformulated in "Free From" Versions, February 2013 (percent of U.S. consumers)
Consumers Favor Additive-Free Foods
Table 7-4: Preference for Foods Without Artificial Additives, 2007-2013 (percent of U.S. households)
Asian Consumers Especially Inclined to Avoid Additives
Table 7-5: Demographic Indicators Favoring a Preference for Additive-Free Foods, Spring 2013 (percent and index of U.S. adults)
Experian Marketing Services: Lifestyles, Food Lifestyles, Health and Well-Being, and Shopping Behavior of Consumers Who Prefer Foods Without Artificial Additives
Psychographics of Additives Avoiders
Table 7-6: Selected Psychographic Classifications of Consumers Who Prefer Additive-Free Foods, Spring 2013 (U.S. households)
Chapter 8: Key Food/Ingredient Categories: Agricultural Production
Key Points
Issues with Plant and Animal Food Products
Issues with Plant-Based Foods
Issues with Animal-Based Foods
Changing Regulatory Environment
Grass-Fed Alternatives for Avoiders
GMO Perceptions
Demand for GMO Ingredients to be Labeled Natural
Major Cereal Companies Turning From GMOs
Avoiders Still Need Safe Products
New Medical & Scientific Research
New Regulatory Directions
Beta Agonists Labeling Move
Pesticide Concerns
Consumer Attitudes/Behavior
Consumers Wary of Growth Hormones, GMOs in Foods
Table 8-1: Avoidance of Artificial Growth Hormones, February 2013 (percent of U.S. consumers)
Table 8-2: Concern About GMO Food Products, June 2013 (percent of U.S.
Table 8-3: Importance of Non-GMO Labeling on Grocery Purchases, June 2013 (percent of consumers)
Table 8-4: Tendency to Purchase Organic Groceries to Avoid GMOs, June 2013 (percent of consumers)
Table 8-5: Importance of Sustainability/Environmental Issues When Making Meat/Poultry/Seafood Purchasing Decisions, June 2013 (percent of consumers)
Chapter 9: Product Trends and Opportunities
Key Points
Specialty Marketers, Store Brands Drive "Free-From"
Formulations Tend Toward Substitution, Not High-Tech
Table 9-1: Selected New "Free-From" Products, 2012-2013
Examples of Free From Products
Illustration 9-1: Daiya Cheddar Style Slices
Illustration 9-2: Smart Balance Blended Butter Sticks
Illustration 9-3: Coco Polo 39% Cocoa chocolate bar
Illustration 9-4: Aromatica No-Salt Spice Blend
Illustration 9-5: Good Food Made Simple Breakfast in a Bowl
Illustration 9-6: Qrunch Veggie Burgers
Illustration 9-7: Prairie Farms Lactose Free Almond Milk
Illustration 9-8: Snyder's of Hanover Gluten Free Pretzel Sticks
Illustration 9-9: Purely American Cholent
Chapter 10 Other Food/Ingredient Categories of Note
Key Points
Some Additional Areas of Food/Ingredient Avoidance
Calories
Caffeine
Fiber
Irradiation
Illustration 10-1: Radura Symbol Used in U.S.
BPA
Nanotechnology


Read the full report:
Food Formulation Trends: Ingredients Consumers Avoid

http://www.reportbuyer.com/food_drink/diet_health_foods/food_formulation_trends_ingredients_consumers_avoid.html

For more information:
Sarah Smith
Research Advisor at Reportbuyer.com
Email: query@reportbuyer.com
Tel: +44 208 816 85 48
Website: www.reportbuyer.com

©2012 PR Newswire. All Rights Reserved.

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