Officials still weighing options for whale carcass - San Diego, California News Station - KFMB Channel 8 - cbs8.com

Officials still weighing options for whale carcass

Posted: Updated:
  • RelatedMore>>

  • Dead whale towed out to sea

    Dead whale towed out to sea

    Wednesday, May 21 2014 10:56 PM EDT2014-05-22 02:56:22 GMT
    Authorities removed a dead fin whale Wednesday from the Point Loma beach where it washed up several days ago. 
    Authorities removed a dead fin whale Wednesday from the Point Loma beach where it washed up several days ago. 
  • Dead whale spotted in water off Point Loma

    Dead whale spotted in water off Point Loma

    Monday, May 19 2014 4:41 PM EDT2014-05-19 20:41:46 GMT
    A dead fin whale washed up overnight on a Point Loma beach, leaving authorities with the stinky task of removing the huge carcass. 
    A dead fin whale washed up overnight on a Point Loma beach, leaving authorities with the stinky task of removing the huge carcass. 
SAN DIEGO (CBS 8) - Officials are still weighing their options to dispose of a fin whale carcass that washed up twice on San Diego shores.

Despite the stench and the long trek it took to get to Border Field State Park in Imperial Beach, dozens of people spent Monday visiting the site where a dead fin whale washed up to shore.

"I think it's really cool, but it stinks," one visitor said.

It's the same whale that washed up at the Point Loma Wastewater Treatment Plant last Monday. Two days later, lifeguards towed the carcass and handed it off to the Marine Conservation Science Institute for shark tracking research. But on Thursday, state officials said the nonprofit wasn't allowed to do their research. On Friday, their tow rope snapped and set the whale free.

"When the rope broke Friday, at that point we're like, we're done. We couldn't do what we wanted to do anyway," Dr. Domeir of the Marine Conservation Science Institute said.

Researchers say it's attracting more than just tourists. There are potentially dangerous predators.

"This whale is still chumming for sharks even though it's on the beach. If you're a surfer, I would not surf anywhere near that whale," Domeier said.

Along with the warning to stay away from Imperial Beach on this Memorial holiday, there are new problems for wildlife. Experts tell CBS News 8 that the California Least Tern birds are endangered. There are roughly 90 nests in the sand and the tiny eggs are easily damaged by humans, coyotes, snakes, seagulls and other predators.

State officials warn beachgoers to stay clear of portions of Imperial a Beach as the carcass is removed. They are looking at four options: tow it back into the water, bury it onshore, transport it to a landfill or leave it on the beach.

They hope to have a set plan in the next few days. Until then, the sight will no doubt continue to attract crowds.

"I'm surprised I'm standing this close to it," visitor Marilyn Nibets said.
Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 WorldNow and Midwest Television, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.