Chargers, Raiders working on plan for $1.7B shared stadium in L. - CBS News 8 - San Diego, CA News Station - KFMB Channel 8

Chargers, Raiders working on plan for $1.7B shared stadium in L.A.

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In this Sunday, Nov. 16, 2014 file photo,The Oakland Raiders and San Diego Chargers face off against each other during the second half of an NFL football game in San Diego. In this Sunday, Nov. 16, 2014 file photo,The Oakland Raiders and San Diego Chargers face off against each other during the second half of an NFL football game in San Diego.
Still shot from Carson2gether YouTube video Still shot from Carson2gether YouTube video
Still shot from Carson2gether YouTube video Still shot from Carson2gether YouTube video
Still shot from Carson2gether YouTube video Still shot from Carson2gether YouTube video
Still shot from Carson2gether YouTube video Still shot from Carson2gether YouTube video
SAN DIEGO (CBS 8/CNS) - San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer blasted the Chargers Friday for not being upfront regarding recent moves that left them on the verge of partnering with the Oakland Raiders to build a football stadium in the Los Angeles suburb of Carson.

"They were actively working to go to L.A. with the Raiders -- that's not being upfront with San Diegans, that's not being upfront with fans," Faulconer said. "We deserve an honest and open dialogue."

His comments came before a news conference in which Carson civic leaders touted their community and embraced the idea of playing host to a pair of National Football League teams.

Mark Fabiani, the Chargers point-man also commented:

"If we get something done in San Diego that works, we're not going to be moving," Fabiani said. "But if we can't, think of it, if it was your business, would you allow your business to be wiped out -- 25 percent of it -- by another team or two teams moving to Los Angeles and then being stuck in an ancient stadium with no other options? That's something you need to ask yourself if you're looking at this from a business point of view."

AUDIO INTERVIEW: CBS 8 talks to Chargers' Special Counsel Mark Fabiani

http://ftpcontent.worldnow.com/kfmb/misc/CBS8-Fabiani-Phoner2.mp3



The Chargers have said in recent years that 20 to 25 percent of their business comes from Los Angeles and Orange counties.

Fabiani attended the Carson news conference but did not speak.

The pep-rally-like news conference in Carson was short of specifics about financing, but backers of the proposed $1.7 billion stadium to be built near the 405 Freeway and Del Amo Boulevard said it would not be built at public expense.

Tim Romer, who runs the Western Region Infrastructure Group of Goldman Sachs, said the site is centrally located in Southern California, has great freeway access and is large enough for "one of the best NFL experiences" for fans.

"In our view, we've concluded that the financing of the stadium here in Carson is very viable and is doable, and we're committed to help and get this done," Romer said.

He said the financing plan would follow the model of $1.3 billion Levi's Stadium, the new home of the San Francisco 49ers in Santa Clara. The facility in the Silicon Valley, however, is financed via a stadium authority made up of city officials, and received financing through a consortium of banks led by Goldman Sachs.

Rep. Janice Hahn, D-San Pedro, stressed that she did not want to steal NFL franchises from other cities.

"We want the Chargers to know and we want the Raiders to know if you can't work it out with your cities, we welcome you with open arms here in Carson," she said. "We will give you a beautiful new stadium. We will give you fans like you have never had before."

Hahn continued her speech and discussed the finances behind a possible new stadium.

"This is not going to be at the public expense. This is going to be privately financed. This is not going to be taxpayers dollars. This is the City of Carson coming together business, political, religious saying we want you here, Chargers and Raiders come on down."


"I just want to say that this opportunity for the people of Carson is an enormous opportunity," Carson Mayor Jim Dear said. "It will change Carson for the better in a very dramatic way."

The Chargers and Raiders, both of which have been pushing for new stadiums in their respective cities, announced Thursday they were working together on a 72,000-seat Carson stadium proposal on the 168-acre parcel, in conjunction with a coalition of business and labor leaders known as "Carson2gether."

"We have both been working in our home markets to find a stadium solution for many years, so far unsuccessfully," according to a joint statement issued by the teams. "We remain committed to continuing to work in our home markets throughout 2015 to try to find publicly acceptable solutions to the long-term stadium issue.

"... We are pursuing this stadium option in Carson for one straightforward reason: If we cannot find a permanent solution in our home markets, we have no alternative but to preserve other options to guarantee the future economic viability of our franchises."

Numerous Carson council members attended the news conference -- a sign that the project would face little opposition at City Hall.

The NFL responded to the Carson proposal with a brief statement: "We are in regular contact with all involved clubs. All clubs have been meeting their responsibilities to keep us informed."

Earlier this month, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell reminded team owners that relocating a franchise requires "multiple approvals from NFL ownership," and such a move "can only be granted by a three-fourths vote of the clubs."

Meanwhile, St. Louis Rams owner Stan Kroenke has joined with the developers of the former Hollywood Park site in Inglewood to announce plans for an 80,000-seat stadium at the location.

The Hollywood Park developers have already collected enough signatures to have the stadium issue placed on the city ballot. The Inglewood City Council is expected to certify the signatures during its meeting on Tuesday.

CARSON2GETHER YOUTUBE VIDEO

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I4pUrUcH0ic

The city of Los Angeles, meanwhile, has an agreement in place with the Anschutz Entertainment Group for an NFL stadium adjacent to the Convention Center in downtown Los Angeles. That deal is contingent on an NFL team agreeing to relocate to the facility.

Developer Ed Roski has also been pushing a stadium proposal in Industry.

An NFL team has not played in the Los Angeles area since 1994.

The Los Angeles Raiders played at Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum from 1982-1994, before returning to Oakland in 1995. The Los Angeles Rams played in the Coliseum from 1946-1979 and at what was then known as Anaheim Stadium from 1980-1994 before moving to St. Louis in 1995.

The Chargers played at the Coliseum in their inaugural 1960 season when they were a member of the American Football League, then moved to San Diego in 1961.

JOINT STATEMENT FROM THE RAIDERS AND THE CHARGERS

February 20, 2015

- We have both been working in our home markets to find a stadium solution for many years, so far unsuccessfully.

- We remain committed to continuing to work in our home markets throughout 2015 to try to find publicly acceptable solutions to the long-term stadium issue.

- We also both understand and respect the NFL's relocation process, and we intend to adhere strictly to the relocation procedures that the League has set forth for Los Angeles.

- In particular, we respect the right of the NFL's owners to decide on all Los Angeles-related relocation issues and understand that any relocation application that is filed for Los Angeles must obtain the approval of three-fourths of the NFL's owners.

- Both teams have kept the NFL owners' committee on Los Angeles, and the Commissioner, fully informed about our joint efforts.

- We are pursuing this stadium option in Carson for one straightforward reason: If we cannot find a permanent solution in our home markets, we have no alternative but to preserve other options to guarantee the future economic viability of our franchises.

- In short, for the remainder of 2015, we intend to move down two tracks simultaneously:

On track one, we will continue to work in our home markets to find permanent stadium solutions that are publicly acceptable.

On track two, we will work in Carson to preserve our options, and the future economic viability of our franchises, in the event that our efforts in our local markets fail.

- Throughout this process we will respect the rules and procedures set forth by the League and defer completely to the ultimate decision of the NFL's owners.

This is a story update. The previous story is below.

LOS ANGELES (AP) - The Oakland Raiders and San Diego Chargers are planning a shared stadium in the Los Angeles area if both teams fail to get new stadium deals in their current hometowns, the teams said in a joint statement Thursday night, adding another layer of complexity to a possible NFL return to the region.

The proposed $1.7-billion stadium would be in Carson, 15 miles south of downtown Los Angeles and home to the Los Angeles Galaxy soccer team.

The statement says the teams have tried and failed for years to find stadium solutions in Oakland and San Diego, and without new agreements in those cities their hands will be forced.

"We are pursuing this stadium option in Carson for one straightforward reason," the statement says. "If we cannot find a permanent solution in our home markets, we have no alternative but to preserve other options to guarantee the future economic viability of our franchises."

The plan creates the odd prospect of divisional rivals suddenly sharing a home field, and of Los Angeles having two NFL teams after going two decades with none.

And it takes the muddled issue of the NFL's return to Southern California and makes it downright messy, with at least three viable stadium plans in the works.

St. Louis Rams owner Stan Kroenke is part of a joint venture to build an 80,000-seat stadium at the site of the former Hollywood Park horse track just 10 miles from Carson in Inglewood.

And a plan remains alive for an NFL facility in downtown Los Angeles. That stadium known as Farmers Field, until recently the leading candidate for the NFL's return, now becomes a long shot with multiple competitors and no clear team attached.

Earlier this month, the NFL sent a memo warning teams that the league itself will be behind any decision to move to Southern California, and established a committee of owners to review the options.

The Chargers and Raiders statement says they will respect and adhere to the guidelines the league laid out.

The teams said they plan to work in good faith through 2015 to find new agreements to stay in their current homes, where they are both in year-to-year leases and both have sought public funding that has been hard to get.

The Chargers' talks with San Diego City Hall to replace the nearly 50-year-old Qualcomm Stadium have grown increasingly contentious. Mayor Kevin Faulconer appointed an advisory group earlier this month to recommend a site and financing plan for a new stadium that can go on the November 2016 ballot. But Chargers' attorney Mark Fabiani told the group that there may not be a publicly acceptable solution to the problem and warned them against using the team for political advantage.

The head of the mayor's group Adam Day said the new plan came as a "complete surprise."

"While it's disappointing to hear the Chargers are moving forward with plans in Los Angeles, we remain committed to finding a solution in San Diego," Day said in a statement.

The Raiders' even older Oakland Coliseum has had sewage and electrical problems and is now the only stadium in the US used as the home for both an NFL and Major League Baseball team, the Oakland Athletics. The team wants to build a new stadium at the site but talks with the city have shown little progress.

Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf said she spoke Thursday night with team president and CEO Marc Badain, "and he continued to assure me that the Raiders' first priority is to stay in Oakland in a new stadium."

Schaaf said she wants to be "a responsible steward of the public dollar, to keep my sports teams and" to redevelop the neighborhood around the Coliseum. She added: "I am committed to not putting public dollars into stadium construction."

The Rams have been in a similar struggle with St. Louis, but have made progress with a burgeoning plan for a 64,000-seat stadium there on the city's north riverfront.

All three teams have Los Angeles ties. The Rams called the area home from 1946 to 1994, the Raiders were here from 1982 to 1994 and the Chargers played their inaugural 1960 season in LA.


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