Kurds capture key Islamic State-held border town in Syria - CBS News 8 - San Diego, CA News Station - KFMB Channel 8

Kurds capture key Islamic State-held border town in Syria

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In this photo taken Monday, June 15, 2015, Iraqi security forces defend their positions against Islamic State group attack in Husaybah, 8 kilometers (5 miles) east of Ramadi, Iraq. The Islamic State group still holds about a third of Iraq and Syria, inclu In this photo taken Monday, June 15, 2015, Iraqi security forces defend their positions against Islamic State group attack in Husaybah, 8 kilometers (5 miles) east of Ramadi, Iraq. The Islamic State group still holds about a third of Iraq and Syria, inclu
In this photo taken Monday, June 15, 2015, Iraqi security forces defend their positions against Islamic State group attack in Husaybah, 8 kilometers (5 miles) east of Ramadi, Iraq. The Islamic State group still holds about a third of Iraq and Syria, inclu In this photo taken Monday, June 15, 2015, Iraqi security forces defend their positions against Islamic State group attack in Husaybah, 8 kilometers (5 miles) east of Ramadi, Iraq. The Islamic State group still holds about a third of Iraq and Syria, inclu
In this photo taken from the Turkish side of the border between Turkey and Syria, in Akcakale, southeastern Turkey, a Turkish soldier stands on an armoured personnel carrier as in the background a flag of the Kurdish People's Protection Units, or YPG, is In this photo taken from the Turkish side of the border between Turkey and Syria, in Akcakale, southeastern Turkey, a Turkish soldier stands on an armoured personnel carrier as in the background a flag of the Kurdish People's Protection Units, or YPG, is
In this combo of two photos taken Tuesday, June 16, 2015 from the Turkish side of the border between Turkey and Syria, in Akcakale, southeastern Turkey, on the left photo a Turkish soldier on an armoured personnel carrier watches over the border the town In this combo of two photos taken Tuesday, June 16, 2015 from the Turkish side of the border between Turkey and Syria, in Akcakale, southeastern Turkey, on the left photo a Turkish soldier on an armoured personnel carrier watches over the border the town
In this combo of two photos taken Tuesday, June 16, 2015, seen from the Turkish side of the border between Turkey and Syria, in Akcakale, southeastern Turkey, on the top photo a flag of the Islamic State group flies over the town of Tal Abyad, Syria, wher In this combo of two photos taken Tuesday, June 16, 2015, seen from the Turkish side of the border between Turkey and Syria, in Akcakale, southeastern Turkey, on the top photo a flag of the Islamic State group flies over the town of Tal Abyad, Syria, wher

BEIRUT (AP) — Kurdish fighters took full control of the border town of Tal Abyad on Tuesday, dealing a major blow to the Islamic State group's ability to wage war in Syria by cutting off a vital supply line to its self-proclaimed capital of Raqqa.

A senior Kurdish commander, Haqi Kobane, told The Associated Press that Kurdish units known as the YPG that he leads, along with their allies from the Free Syrian Army, were starting to clear booby traps and mines in the town along the border with Turkey. The extremists had been in control of it for more than a year.

"Daesh has been broken at the hands of the YPG. ... It is a victory for all Syrians," he said by telephone from northern Syria, using the Arabic acronym for the Islamic State group.

The Kurdish advance has displaced some 23,000 people who fled to Turkey to escape the fighting, according to the United Nations refugee agency, UNHCR, in Turkey. Around 70 percent are women and children.

An Associated Press team on the Turkish side of the Akcakale border crossing said a large black and whiteIslamic State group flag was taken down from a pole in Tal Abyad and replaced with a yellow, triangular YPG flag Tuesday.

The border was calm, in sharp contrast to previous days when thousands of Syrians poured into the bordercrossing, some punching a hole in the fence to break into Turkey. On Tuesday, a few civilians were seen walking around, along with some people on the Turkish side apparently waiting to go back into Syria.

The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights also confirmed Tuesday that the YPG seized the town with the Free Syrian Army.

The takeover of Tal Abyad marks the biggest setback yet to the Islamic State group, which lost a key supply line for its nearby self-proclaimed capital in Raqqa. It deprives the group of a direct route for bringing in foreign militants and supplies, and links the Kurds' two fronts, putting even more pressure on Raqqa.

The U.S. provided crucial air cover for the Kurds in their advance, launching concentrated airstrikes that targeted the militants inside and along supply routes.

The Islamic State defeat in Tal Abyad is a stunning reversal of fortunes for the group, which only last monthcaptured the provincial capital of Ramadi in Iraq's Anbar province and the historic town of Palmyra in centralSyria.

The Islamic State group still holds about a third of Iraq and Syria, including Iraq's second-largest city, Mosul. Extremist fighters continue to battle Iraqi security forces and Shiite militiamen for territory north and east of the capital, Baghdad.

On Tuesday, Iraqi officials said that families began returning to Tikrit two and a half months after security forces backed by Shiite militias drove the Islamic State group out of the Sunni city.

Gov. Raed al-Jabouri of Salahuddin province told the AP in a phone interview that around 200 families, who spent the past months either in makeshift tent camps or half-built and abandoned buildings outside the city, had returned the day before.

Al-Jabouri said more than 1,000 families are expected to return Thursday.

Deputy governor Ammar Hikmat said public services inside the city are still struggling due to military operations and that authorities are working to restore them. Hikmat added that the main challenge was electricity as the national grid offers less than 10 hours a day of power, while many of the generator plants outside the city are not working. He said drinking water was available for about 80 percent for the city.

Both al-Jabouri and Hikmat said work was still underway to compensate those who have had their properties damaged.

State television aired footage of security forces guarding buses packed with people, some waving Iraqi flags. Some residents could be seen embracing security forces when they reached Tikrit, Saddam Hussein's hometown, while others fired rifles into the air in celebration.

The Islamic State group captured Tikrit last summer during its sweep across the country. Iraqi forces managed to retake it following weeks of intense fighting and U.S.-led airstrikes, marking their biggest gain yet against the extremist group in Iraq.

According to Iraq's Migration and Displaced Ministry, around 400,000 people fled the province of Salahuddin, where Tikrit is the capital, since its capture in June 2014. Some families have trickled back to liberated areas outside Tikrit, but this the first time they are returning to the provincial capital.

After retaking Tikrit in April, officials said it would take time for people to return because bombs needed to be cleared, police stations opened and services restored.

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Salaheddin reported from Baghdad. Associated Press writers Lefteris Pitarakis and Berza Simsek in Akcakale, Turkey, and Suzan Fraser in Ankara, Turkey, contributed to this report.

Copyright 2015 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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