Migrant groups march to U.S. Consulate in Tijuana with demands - CBS News 8 - San Diego, CA News Station - KFMB Channel 8

Migrant groups march to U.S. Consulate in Tijuana with demands

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In this Nov. 19, 2018, file photo, people line up to cross into the United States from Tijuana, Mexico, seen through barriers topped with concertina wire at the San Ysidro port of entry in San Diego.  (AP Photo/Gregory Bull, file) In this Nov. 19, 2018, file photo, people line up to cross into the United States from Tijuana, Mexico, seen through barriers topped with concertina wire at the San Ysidro port of entry in San Diego. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull, file)

SAN DIEGO (NEWS 8) - Migrants at the border are making new demands. Two separate groups marched to the U.S. Consulate in Tijuana Tuesday, calling for a speedier asylum process.

Some are demanding that they be processed through the asylum system more quickly and in greater numbers, that deportations be halted and that President Trump either let them into the country or pay them $50,000 each to go home, according to the San Diego Union-Tribune.

When asked how the group came up with the $50,000 figure, organizer Alfonso Guerrero Ulloa of Honduras, said they chose that number as a group.

San Diego U.S. Customs and Border Protection released the following statement regarding timing for processing persons arriving at the San Ysidro Port of Entry without documents or legal status in the U.S. at the border:

The system was already at capacity before the arrival of the caravan, not just with CBP at the border, but at all points of our immigration system.  Prior to the arrival of the migrant caravan, there were approximately 2,800 people without documents to enter the U.S. waiting in Tijuana to present themselves to a CBP officer at the San Ysidro port of entry. The individuals from the caravan would be processed after those individuals, starting in about 5-8 weeks.

DHS is utilizing our limited resources as efficiently and effectively as possible in the midst of the current surge at our Southwest Border. The reality is that unless Congress responds to our repeated requests for additional resources and to address pull factors for illegal immigration, we will continue to experience capacity challenges.

Congressional leaders on Wednesday were digging in for a fight over government funding, a day after a combative White House meeting with President Donald Trump that seemed to raise the likelihood of a partial government shutdown.

Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer said Trump was holding parts of the government "hostage to a petty campaign pledge" to build a border wall with Mexico in order to "fire up" his political base.

Schumer, who met with Trump and House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi on Tuesday, said the American people will "suffer needlessly" if Trump follows through on his threat to shut down parts of the government as of Dec. 21 unless $5 billion for the southern border wall is included in a must-pass spending bill.

Trump said on Tuesday he is "proud to shut down the government" in the name of border security, declaring: "I will take the mantle. I will be the one to shut it down."

On Twitter on Wednesday, Trump said a deadly shooting attack in France shows the need for the border wall.

"Chuck and Nancy must give us the votes to get additional Border Security!" he wrote, referring to Schumer and Pelosi.

Schumer said Wednesday it is "nearly impossible" to negotiate with Trump, accusing the president of peddling "blatant and dangerous falsehoods" about the wall, including his widely refuted claim that Mexico will pay for it.

The Democrats said they have given Trump two options to keep government open, and the responsibility lay with him and Republicans who control Congress.

The wall remains the main sticking point in talks. Republican House Speaker Paul Ryan acknowledged Tuesday that the GOP-led House has yet to pass legislation that includes the $5 billion in border wall funds that Trump has been requesting. Ryan likely lacks sufficient votes from Republicans who will lose their majority at the end of the month.

Democrats have offered $1.3 billion for border security, including physical barriers and technology along the U.S. southern border.

If the two sides do not make a deal by Dec. 21, about one-quarter of the government will be affected, including the departments of Homeland Security, Transportation, Agriculture, State and Justice, as well as national parks.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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