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VERIFY: No, a vaccinated person can't spread side effects to other people. Here's the scientific reason why

The Pfizer vaccine is based on a spiked mRNA protein that was in the original virus, but its only job is to mimic the live virus so your body has an immune response.

There’s a post, spreading around Facebook, that makes multiple claims about the supposed dangers of the Pfizer vaccine.

Some of the claims are connected to the type of things that can happen if an unvaccinated person comes into contact with a vaccinated person, and the "dangers" that go along with it.

THE QUESTION

Can someone who received the Pfizer vaccine spread side effects to other people?

THE SOURCE

Dr. Anita Gupta, anesthesiologist and adjunct professor at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in the Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care

Dr. Kareem Elshatory, medical director at Trusted ER

THE ANSWER

No. Neither the Pfizer vaccine nor its side effects can be passed to an unvaccinated person.

RELATED: Texas has surpassed 50,000 COVID-19 deaths

WHAT WE FOUND

When you spread a virus to another person – through contact or the air – that’s called viral shedding. Depending on the virus, certain ways of spreading can be more dangerous than others.

The Facebook post claims viral shedding can happen if you get the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine. But that’s not true. This is because Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine does not contain any live COVID-19 virus.

"Individuals should not be concerned that this could occur," Gupta said.

The Pfizer vaccine is based on a spiked mRNA protein that was in the original virus, but its only job is to mimic the live virus so your body has an immune response.

"The only risk that the person who didn't get the vaccine probably has, is getting COVID-19," Elshatory said. "There's absolutely no way of getting virus shedding from a vaccinated patient. There is no shedding whatsoever."

The reason a vaccinated person could still potentially spread the actual COVID-19 virus to an unvaccinated person is that there’s still a small chance a vaccinated person can catch COVID-19 in what are known as "breakthrough cases."