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Storm chances to start the weekend, drier to wrap it up

Monsoonal moisture will stick around for Saturday. We could see afternoon & evening storms inland. The air will start to dry out on Sunday as high pressure moves in.

There was more of an influx in monsoonal moisture on Friday. We saw it in the form of mid to high clouds and more ominous looking ones over the mountains and desert with the heating of the day. A strong cell developed northeast of Palomar Mountain and prompted a Flash Flood Warning. It expired by 5 pm.

Credit: KFMB-TV Weather Dept.

Storm chances diminished shortly before our sunset at 7:48 pm, but we are not done yet. Warm/humid air will continue to stream in across the county. This will keep relative humidity elevated and another chance for afternoon and evening thunderstorms over the mountains and desert for Saturday. Strong cells could produce strong gusts, thunder, lightning and brief downpours. Those downpours will increase the risk of flash flooding.

Credit: KFMB-TV Weather Dept.

Temperatures will not be consistent due to the added mid and high level cloud cover in the mountains and desert for tomorrow. Daytime highs will remain consistent in the 70s along the coast with 90s for the inland valleys. The mountains and desert will peak below seasonal due to the cloud cover on Saturday.

FRIDAY HIGHS:

Credit: KFMB-TV Weather Dept.

SATURDAY HIGHS:

Credit: KFMB-TV Weather Dept.

AT THE COAST THROUGH SATURDAY:

Credit: KFMB-TV Weather Dept.
Credit: KFMB-TV Weather Dept.

Models look to scale back on a chance for more wet weather by the second half of the weekend. This will be in response to a ridge of high pressure amplifying over the region as a trough of low pressure moves in along the West Coast. This will be the case for much of next week. Temperatures will warm above seasonal and the air will dry out. Expect a shallow marine layer overnight favoring the coast and lots of afternoon sunshine into next weekend. 

Credit: KFMB-TV Weather Dept.
Credit: KFMB-TV Weather Dept.