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CBS News 8 - San Diego, CA News Station - KFMB Channel 8 | cbs8.com

Acts of kindness in San Diego amid coronavirus

San Diegans offering to run errands through social media site Nextdoor.

San Diegans are finding ways to help each other out during the COVID-19 crisis.

"I'm worried myself, but I've found in my life when I reach out and offer to serve it's kind of a distraction and it makes me feel better. I know other people feel the same way," said Madison Geist.

She posted on the social media site Nextdoor, offering to help any seniors in her downtown neighborhood get groceries. She's also helping people at her church.

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"I had a woman from my church who I called up, she doesn’t have a car and she's elderly. She just felt really touched that someone is looking out for her in these times," said Geist.

There are also businesses helping seniors as well.

The grocery chain, Northgate Market, has special senior hours- from 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. in an effort to help them avoid the overwhelming crowds. 

The popular restaurant chain, Puesto, announced on Instagram Monday it was giving away free care packages filled with fresh ingredients and food. They sent out more than 500 packages within two hours. Co-founder Eric Adler is a San Diego native.

"It was great," he said. "People were really happy, we wanted to do our small part."

People are doing their part on Facebook as well. The group, San Diego Community Volunteers for Coronavirus Response is now a resource for people who want to volunteer to help. Adriana Schaffer started the page and watched it grow from just 50 members to more than 400 since Saturday.

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"I'm so excited so many people want to get involved and help out and understand the importance of coming together as a community at this time," said Schaffer.

"I think when we reach out and let others know they're cared for, it's life-changing," said Geist.