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Election stress is a real issue

Post-election stress is at an all-time high right now, but a local psychiatrist says there are simple ways we can manage our feelings.

SAN DIEGO COUNTY, Calif — A local psychiatrist has seen an uptick in the number of people seeking professional help due to election stress.

"Even today I've seen 10 to 15 patients already and there is not one that is not anxious or stressed out about what's going on," said Dr. Michael Theodore Lardon, psychiatrist.

People are worried about the future of our country and about the possibility of more rioting that we've seen over the past few months. Images of business boarded up and dealing with pandemic stress adds to that anxiety.

"There's the old adage - the straw that broke the camel's back. And if there is so much stress, you can exceed one's capacity. The fancy term for it, but people have just had too much," said Lardon.

According to a local psychotherapist, our mental health would thank us if we stayed off social media until after the election is over.

"So many people I talk to now say - I am going to limit how much I watch the news. Because every time I watch it, I get so anxious. And people are getting sick emotionally and physically," said Wendy Hill, Ph.D.

Both point to ways we can avoid being overwhelmed by the uncertain fate of America. 

"I'm like anyone else. There's a child inside of me that I have to talk to. I talked to her recently and said - ok sweet girl, you are going to be alright and I will take care of you. And it helps me as well," said Dr. Hill.

"And you need to take care of yourself. Just like the same advice we've been giving for the pandemic - exercise, connect with people you love. Take care of yourself. It's no different than that," said Larson.

Also, channel your stress into something productive and set boundaries around political conversations with loved ones. 

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